Today, I will explore the Sensouji Temple in Asakusa. Sensouji is the oldest temple in Tokyo and a popular tourist spot known all over the world. When you pass under the giant lantern of the Kaminari Gate, you will see Nakamise Street and further down is the main temple. At a place called Asakusa Kibidango Azuma (seen below) on Nakamise Street,  I bought dango (dumplings) and amazake (sweet sake). The mochi-like texture of the dumplings taste great and the sweet sake warms me up in this cold weather. At a shop called Hanaya, tourists can buy the popular souvenirs, such as dolls and folding fans. Near the main temple there […]

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  In Asakusa’s Sensouji Temple area there is a popular kimono rental shop among tourists called ‘i’. Here you can experience a traditional part of Japanese culture. Today, I am going to try on a cute kimono here at Sensouji’s ‘i’ shop. Here you can pick which kimono and kimono sash you like best. You can put it on yourself or get help from the staff who will put it on nicely for you. After I put on my kimono at ‘i’ shop, I go out to explore Asakusa.   If you ever visit Asakusa, try on a cute kimono at Sensouji’s ‘i’ shop and explore around Asakusa to really […]

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  Hello! I am Reina of HowtojapanTV. Today I have come to a stage that offers a Samurai experience called Samurai-live. First, we learn the basics: common courtesy. To begin and end training we greet each other and meditate. Today I will be taught by Godai-sensei. He will carefully teach me the basics of sword fighting. For about an hour and a half I will learn common courtesy, how to handle a sword, how to stand and walk, fighting movements, and more. My heart is pounding! This is exciting! The actual training is done one-on-one and is tailored towards the needs of the person participating. Thanks to Godai-sensei’s kind and […]

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What’s Oden-Can? Oden-can is one of the symbolic foods in Akihabara. That is because nobody had the idea of making and selling caned Oden before that. Since then, it has become very popular. What’s including? ・Daikon radish ・Tofu ・Kombu seaweed ・Konnyaku ・Boiled eggs etc After you have done, put the can into the trash box Information Hours Monday – Saturday 11:00 – 18:00 Closed Sunday Access Three minutes on foot from Denkigaiguchi Exit of Akihabara Station

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Setsubun “Bean-Throwing Festival” Hello, I’m Minami of How to Japan TV. Today, I introduce you “Setsubun” (節分 Bean-Throwing Festival) , traditional culture of Japan. Why throw Beans? Setsubun is a fun traditional holiday that is celebrated on February 3rd. It is known in English as “Bean-throwing Festival.” On the day, there is the custom of throwing roasted soybeans. So why throw beans? That’s because it’s believed that the good fortune will come to one’s home. And the evils are warded off by throwing beans. If you eat the same number of beans as your age, you will enjoy a year of good health. How to enjoy Setsubun Festival First, you […]

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Japanese Shodo Calligraphy Today,I would like to teach you about Shodo (書道). Shodo is Japanese calligraphy Usually, most of children learn calligraphy in elementary school. It is also popular among adults. Tools If you start shodo, you need to prepare a variety of tools. 筆(Fude) : Brush 下敷き(Shitajiki) : Black soft mat. It provides a comfortable, soft surface. 文鎮(Bunchin) : Metal stick. It’s to weight down the paper during writing. 半紙(Hanshi) : Special, thin calligraphy paper. 硯(Suzuri) : Heavy black container. 墨(Sumi) : Ink stick. Solid black material that must be rubbed in water in the suzuri to produce the black ink which is then used for writing. 墨汁(Bokujyu) : […]

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How to get your Omikuji (fortune telling) OmikujiI is random fortune written on strips of paper at Shinto shrines and Buddhisttemples in Japan. Literally “sacred lot”. Step 1 Pay 100 yen for your fortune. Step 2 Shake the box a few times while praying for your wish. The stick marked fortune number will come out. Step 3 The stick with number will come out. And be sure to remember this number. Step 4 Put the stick in the box. Step 5 Receive the fortune at the counter. Step 6 Confirm your fortune.there are many tipes of fortune. Great blessing (dai-kichi, 大吉) Middle blessing (chū-kichi, 中吉) Small blessing (shō-kichi, 小吉) Blessing […]

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How to visit a Shinto Shrine in Japan Before you worship, purify your hands and mouth at the “Temizuya” water pavilion. Step 1 hold the dipper using right hand, and pour water on your left. Step 2 In the same way, wash your right hand. Step 3 Hold it on your right hand, pour water on your left hand to rinse your mouth. Step 4 Wash your left hand again. Worship Step 1 Throw a coin into the offering box. Five yen coin is good.Five is “go” in Japanese.So we refer to this five-yen coin as “go-en”. And speaking about “yen”, our currency’s proper pronouciation is “en”. And “en” also […]

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Make your wish, Write on Ema! What is Ema? Ema (絵馬) are small wooden plaques.The ema are then left hanging up at the shrine, where the Kami ( 神 spirits or gods) receive them.This can be found at shrines all over Japan.As Buddhism and Shinto have mixed up a lot, it is not unique to shrines. In recent days people write their wishes or prayers on a wooden plaque that can be purchased at the shrine and then hang it up on the shrine grounds. Many foreign tourists come to shrine and write one’s wishes.You can find Korean, English, Chinese and other languages in these Ema. You can buy a […]

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